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In addition, it was suggested that traditional Online Transaction Processing systems (OLTP) don’t suffer from such limitations, rendering them more suitable for the emerging e-commerce applications that may require such guarantees. This article discusses this question and shows that there’s nothing inherently wrong with these new models that prevents applications from using them to obtain end-to-end transactionality. However, before addressing the question of whether or not any specific transaction system can be used to provide end-to-end transactional guarantees, it’s important to realize the following: end-to-end transactionality is not some holy grail that people have been searching for in myths and legends; it’s a solution to one specific problem area, not a global panacea to all transaction issues. The ability or lack thereof to guarantee end-to-end transactio... (more)

Stateful Interactions in Web Services

In July 2003 a consortium of Web services vendors released the Web services Composite Application Framework (WS-CAF) to the community. WS-CAF is comprised of three specifications that together provide a means of reliably composing individual Web services into larger aggregate applications. The cornerstone of this suite is the management of stateful interactions between Web services that is the domain of the WS-Context specification. WS-CAF was subsequently submitted to OASIS and an effort to standardize the framework is currently underway. In January 2004 a group of industry and... (more)

Introducing WS-Coordination

In July 2002, BEA, IBM, and Microsoft released a trio of specifications designed to support business transactions over Web services. These specifications - BPEL4WS, WS-Transaction, and WS-Coordination - together form the bedrock for reliably choreographing Web services-based applications, providing business process management, transactional integrity, and generic coordination facilities respectively. This article introduces the underlying concepts of Web Services Coordination, and shows how a generic coordination framework can be used to provide the foundations for higher-level ... (more)

Introducing WS-CAF - More than just transactions

Web services have become the integration platform of choice for enterprise applications. Those applications by the very nature of their enterprise-scale components can be complex in structure, which is compounded by the need to share common data or context across business processes supported by those applications. Those processes may be very long lived, and may contain periods of inactivity, for example, where constituent services require user interactions. In response to these issues, WSCAF (Web Services Composite Application Framework) was publicly released in July 2003 after ... (more)

Introducing WS-Transaction Part 1

In July 2002, BEA, IBM, and Microsoft released a trio of specifications designed to support business transactions over Web services. These specifications, BPEL4WS, WS-Transaction, and WS-Coordination, together form the bedrock for reliably choreographing Web services-based applications, providing business process management, transactional integrity, and generic coordination facilities respectively. In our previous article (WSJ, Volume 3, issue 5), we introduced WS-Coordination, a generic coordination framework for Web services, and showed how the WS-Coordination protocol can be ... (more)